Fascination of the celestial bodies

Fascination of the celestial bodies

My father explains our night sky to me every saturday. For all those who are now wondering: no, you didn’t learn the wrong motto for the planetary system in school. But sometimes it is also time for such rough systems like the universe to rearrange itself.
This is not news, but many of the visitors who came to the "evening of the open door" were very interested came to the sternwarte feuerstein were a bit astonished. As early as 2006, pluto was stripped of its planetary status by the international astronomical union. Since then, it has been dubbed the dwarf planet.
Also the fact that a day does not have 24 hours, but only 23 hours and 56 minutes due to the earth’s own movement, must have been new for some guests. Frank fleischmann, graduate physicist and chairman of the association observatory forchheim, explained to the audience passionately and very vividly numerous astronomical phenomena, their origin and meaning.
A journey through the infinite vastness, stopping for example at the shooting stars. Shooting stars? Aren’t they the yellow lights that make us wish for the most beautiful things when they appear?? First correct. But the next time we look into the sky, we can’t turn off our knowledge about it any more. Grains of sand from space hit the earth’s atmosphere at a speed of about 50 kilometers per second (that’s about the distance from ebermannstadt to nurnberg in one second). The sand grain is first slowed down by the air molecules. The friction heats the particle – also called meteorite – up to 3000 degrees. The surrounding air is made to glow and the meteorite becomes a meteor, which we colloquially refer to as a shooting star.
To illustrate this, frank fleischmann makes a simple comparison: "let’s take a cup of coffee and let milk drip into it. The surface tension causes the droplet to snap upwards. So similarly we can see the formation of central mountains in lunar craters."
One visitor in particular watches the spinning telescope attentively: david gotz. Already the lecture he could inspire by his astronomical knowledge and interest. Unfortunately, the cloud cover was too dense this evening to dare a look through the telescope. But the eleven-year-old is relaxed about it: "I’ve never looked through a telescope before, but that’s not so bad. I am especially interested in the beautiful astro-images, the black holes and the saturn rings."
The student from ebermannstadt doesn’t know yet if this passion will become a profession, but one thing is for sure: "so much fascination for the material that surrounds us is infectious and shows once again how small we humans appear in the face of the mighty nature."

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